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Summary Report: 2013/4 EFA Global Monitoring Report, Teaching and learning: Achieving quality for all.

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68th Session of the UN General Assembly: Key events and trends in Disability and Development

Making Education a Priority in the Post-2015 Development Agenda

Report of the Global Thematic Consultation on Education in the Post-2015 Development Agenda

10 September 2013 – A new report has been launched by the Global Thematic Consultation on Education in the Post-2015 Development Agenda co-led by UNICEF and UNESCO, with support from the Governments of Canada, Germany and Senegal and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation.

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The Committee of Ministers has taken note of Parliamentary Assembly Recommendation 1990 (2012) on “The right of everyone to take part in cultural life” and of the appended Guidelines for developing policies to ensure effective participation in cultural life. It brought this recommendation to the attention of the member States’ governments so that they might be guided by it in framing their national policies, also transmitting it to the relevant Council of Europe committees1 and to the Executive Committee of the North-South Centre for information and for receipt of any comments they might have.

Category: 

Legislation, Policy and Financing

Authors:

Council of Ministers

Year: 

2012

About 15% of the world population lives with some form of disability. Yet little is known about the economic lives of persons with disabilities, especially in developing countries. This paper uses for the first time internationally comparable data to draw an economic profile of persons with disabilities in 15 developing countries. In most countries, disability is found to be significantly associated with higher multidimensional poverty as well as lower educational attainment, lower employment rates, and higher medical expenditures. Among persons with disabilities, persons aged 40 and above and persons with multiple disabilities were more likely to be multi-dimensionally poor

Category: 

Implementation

Year: 

2012

This study was designed to develop more effective ways to address culture and cultural differences in the preparation of preservice teachers. Its purpose was to provide a more adequate 
preparation for working in high-need schools by assisting educators in the development of “habits of mind” that incorporate an understanding and valuing of students’ cultures and a recognition of the need to consider those cultures in teaching practices. This paper reports data from the second year of a five-year study that examined the experience of six preservice teachers. The data indicate that using ethnography as an observational tool helps preservice teachers become more aware of cultural differences. 

 

Category: 

Teachers, Teaching and Pedagogy

Authors:

Susan Davis Lenski & Kathleen Crawford & Thomas Crumpler & Corsandra Stallworth

Year: 

2005

The Governments at the High-level Intergovernmental Meeting adopted the Ministerial Declaration on the Asian and Pacific Decade of Persons with Disabilities, 2013–2022, and the Incheon Strategy to “Make the Right Real” for Persons with Disabilities in Asia and the Pacific.

The Incheon Strategy provides the Asian and Pacific region, and the world, with the first set of regionally agreed disability-inclusive development goals. Developed over more than two years of consultations with governments and civil society stakeholders, the Incheon Strategy comprises 10 goals, 27 targets and 62 indicators. The Incheon Strategy builds on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Biwako Millennium Framework for Action and Biwako Plus Five towards an Inclusive, Barrier-free and Rights-based Society for Persons with Disabilities in Asia and the Pacific.

The Incheon Strategy will enable the Asian and Pacific region to track progress towards improving the quality of life, and the fulfilment of the rights, of the region’s 650 million persons with disabilities, most of whom live in poverty. The ESCAP secretariat is mandated to report every three years until the end of the Decade in 2022, on progress in the implementation of the Ministerial
Declaration and the Incheon Strategy.

Category: 

Legislation, Policy and Financing

Authors:

United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific

Year: 

2012

In this article, the relationships between ‘special’ and ‘inclusive’ education is examined. The author looks at the notion of specialist knowledge among teachers and at the roles adopted by staff working with pupils with ‘additional’ or ‘special’ needs in mainstream settings. She explores the implications of the use of the concept of ‘special needs’ – especially in relation to attempts to implement inclusion in practice – and she notes the tensions that arise from these relationships. She goes on to ask a series of questions: How do teachers respond to differences among their pupils? What knowledge do teachers need in order to respond more effectively to diversity in their classrooms? What are the roles of teacher education and ongoing professional development?
How can teachers be better prepared to work in mixed groupings of pupils? In seeking answers to these questions, Lani Florian concludes that we should look at educational practices and undertake a thorough examination of how teachers work in their classrooms. She suggests that it is through an examination of ‘the things that teachers can do’ that we will begin to bring meaning to the concept of inclusion.

Category: 

Teachers, Teaching and Pedagogy

Year: 

2008

This paper argues that inclusion is the major challenge facing educational systems around the world. Reflecting on evidence from a programme of research carried out over the last ten years, it provides a framework for determining levers that can help to ease systems in a more inclusive direction. The focus is on factors within schools that influence the development of thinking and practice, as well as wider contextual factors that may constrain such developments. It is argued that many of the barriers experienced by learners arise from existing ways of thinking. Consequently, strategies for developing inclusive practices have to involve interruptions to thinking, in order to encourage an exploration of overlooked possibilities for moving practice forward.

Category: 

Implementation

Authors:

Mel Ainscow

Year: 

2004

The Report focuses on measures to improve accessibility and equality of opportunity; promoting participation and inclusion; and increasing respect for the autonomy and dignity of persons with disabilities. Chapter 1 defines terms such as disability, discusses prevention and its ethical considerations, introduces the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and the CRPD, and discusses disability and human rights, and disability and development. Chapter 2 reviews the data on disability prevalence and the situation of people with disabilities worldwide. Chapter 3 explores access to mainstream health services for people with disabilities. Chapter 4 discusses rehabilitation, including therapies and assistive devices. Chapter 5 investigates support and assistance services. Chapter 6 explores inclusive environments, both in terms of physical access to buildings, transport, and so on, but also access to the virtual environments of information and communication technology. Chapter 7 discusses education, and Chapter 8 reviews employment for people with disabilities. Each chapter includes recommendations, which are also drawn together to provide broad policy and practice considerations in Chapter 9.

Category: 

Legislation, Policy and Financing

Authors:

World Health Organization & The World Bank

Year: 

2011

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