Implementation

This report presents the key findings, conclusions and recommendations of the research on the use of assistive information technology (hereinafter called: assistive technology) in the instruction at primary schools in Macedonia.

The goals of the research were: (1) to document the current situation concerning the use of computers in the instruction at primary schools as a tool to improve the quality of the education of students with special educational needs, and (2) to identify the needs and possibilities concerning the use of assistive technology in the instruction. 

The research was conducted in the context of the on-going long-term efforts of the educational authorities to build an inclusive and modern educational system, based on wide use of computers and information technology in the instruction. It was a part of the USAID program for e-accessible primary schools “Equal Access for Equal Opportunities”, implemented by the “Open the Windows” civic organization.

Category: 

Implementation

Year: 

2011

The Republic of Armenia undertook to promote, safeguard, and secure the full and equal enjoyment by persons with disabilities of their human rights and fundamental freedoms. Support should be extended to persons with disabilities from early childhood so as to ensure the full development of their potential and the possibility to be equal members of society. Sound qualitative and quantitative research, which will identify the existing gaps related to the environment and service delivery, is essential for the development and implementation of effective policies and programmes in the sector. The survey on the access to services for children with disabilities living in Armenia, carried out by UNICEF upon the request of the Ministry of Labour and Social Issues of the Republic of Armenia, is the first large-scale study of this type. It contains abundant data that will be used by the Government of Armenia for choosing policies to be implemented in the sector.

Category: 

Implementation

Authors:

UNICEF Armenia

Year: 

2012

About 15% of the world population lives with some form of disability. Yet little is known about the economic lives of persons with disabilities, especially in developing countries. This paper uses for the first time internationally comparable data to draw an economic profile of persons with disabilities in 15 developing countries. In most countries, disability is found to be significantly associated with higher multidimensional poverty as well as lower educational attainment, lower employment rates, and higher medical expenditures. Among persons with disabilities, persons aged 40 and above and persons with multiple disabilities were more likely to be multi-dimensionally poor

Category: 

Implementation

Authors:

Brandon Vick

Year: 

2012

This paper argues that inclusion is the major challenge facing educational systems around the world. Reflecting on evidence from a programme of research carried out over the last ten years, it provides a framework for determining levers that can help to ease systems in a more inclusive direction. The focus is on factors within schools that influence the development of thinking and practice, as well as wider contextual factors that may constrain such developments. It is argued that many of the barriers experienced by learners arise from existing ways of thinking. Consequently, strategies for developing inclusive practices have to involve interruptions to thinking, in order to encourage an exploration of overlooked possibilities for moving practice forward.

Category: 

Implementation

Authors:

Mel Ainscow

Year: 

2004

The Dakar Framework for Action adopted a World Declaration on Education for All (EFA) in 2000, which established the goal to provide every girl and boy with primary school education by 2015. It also clearly identified Inclusive Education (IE) as a key strategy for the development of EFA. The Salamanca Statement and Framework for Action endorsed by 92 overnments and 25 international organizations at the World Conference on Special Needs Education, June 1994 in Salamanca, Spain proclaims that every child has unique haracteristics, interests, abilities, and learning needs and that “those with special education needs must have access to regular schools which should accommodate them with a child-centered pedagogy capable of meeting those needs.” The Salamanca Statement also asserts that educational systems that take into account the wide diversity of children’s haracteristics and needs “are the most effective means of combating discriminatory attitudes, creating welcoming communities, building an inclusive society and achieving education for all; moreover, they provide an effective education to the majority of children and improve the efficiency and ultimately the cost-effectiveness of the entire education system.

Category: 

Implementation

Year: 

2004

The report will present the perspective of people with intellectual disabilities and their families on living and being included in the community. We want to share our experiences of inclusion in the community, of exclusion and isolation from the community and the impact that these experiences have had on the lives of people with intellectual disabilities and their families.

Category: 

Implementation

Year: 

2012

The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities was the first human rights convention of the 21st Century. Drafted 17 years after the Convention on the Rights of the Child, and 27 years after the Convention on Elimination of Discrimination against Women, it brings a more progressive interpretation of principles and approaches to human rights and adds to the overall human rights discourse and understanding, not only in the field of disability. This is a fundamental contribution that has to be taken into consideration in our work for children in Geneva.

This paper sets out to examine the synergies between three key treaties of relevance to the rights of children with disabilities: the Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989), the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (2006) and the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination against Women (1979). They each dovetail, reinforce, and elaborate the others, and contribute towards the goals of equality and inclusive development. Their inter-related nature was acknowledged in the Secretary General’s Status Report and Omnibus Resolution on children with disabilities, adopted by the UN General Assembly in 2011. Together they embody four core values of human rights law that are of particular importance in the context of disability.
• the dignity of each individual, who is deemed to be of inestimable value because of his/her inherent selfworth, and not because s/he is economically or otherwise ‘useful’;
• the concept of autonomy or self-determination, which is based on the presumption of a capacity for self-directed action and behaviour, and requires that the person be placed at the centre of all decisions affecting him/her;
• the inherent equality of all regardless of difference;
• the ethic of solidarity, which requires society to sustain the freedom of the person with appropriate social support.

It is intended that this analysis will strengthen awareness and understanding of how the synergy between these Conventions can be used to facilitate more effective advocacy, legislative and policy development, and accountability to promote the rights of children with disabilities.
 

Category: 

Implementation

Year: 

2009

This guide was developed on behalf of the INEE Task Team on Inclusive Education and Disability by Ingrid Lewis with Duncan Little and Helen Pinnock. The INEE Task Team on Inclusive Education and Disability works to promote the key principles, behaviours and actions necessary for ensuring that all excluded and marginalised people affected by crisis are included in education preparedness, response and recovery activities. For more information on INEE and the INEE Inclusive Education and Disability Task Team visit www.ineesite.org.

Category: 

Implementation

Year: 

2010

In today’s increasingly globalized world, with its rising disparities in income distribution, where 60 per cent of the world’s population live on only 6 per cent of the world’s income, half of the world’s population lives on two dollars a day and over 1 billion people live on less than one dollar a day, ‘poverty is a threat to peace’.4 Poverty and other factors contributing to exclusion seriously affect education. While progress is being made towards the Education for All (EFA) goals and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) as demonstrated by the drop in numbers of out-of-school children and increasing enrolment rates, there is now a stronger focus on those learners who are still out of school or are hard to reach.5 More attention is also being paid to the many children and young people who attend school but who are excluded from learning, who may not complete the full cycle of primary education or who do not receive an education of good quality.

Category: 

Implementation

Year: 

2009

Early childhood is the period from prenatal development to eight years of age. It is a crucial phase of growth and development because experiences during early childhood can influence outcomes across the entire course of an individual’s life (1,2). For all children, early childhood provides an important window of opportunity to prepare the foundation for life-long learning and participation, while preventing potential delays in development and disabilities. For children who experience disability, it is a vital time to ensure access to interventions which can help them reach their full potential (1,3)

Category: 

Implementation

Year: 

2012

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